Please note: Any medical or genetic information present in this entry is not intended as a diagnosis of your problem, but rather is provided as a helpful guide for research, educational and informational purposes only. It is not in any way intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Information is not necessarily complete. Please see your doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

Please note: DNAtraffic database is the project under construction and information on this page is not finished yet.

Temafloxacin


ACCESSION NB: DB01405


TYPE: small molecule


GROUP: withdrawn


DESCRIPTION:
Temafloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic drug which was withdrawn from sale in the U.S. shortly after its approval in 1992 because of serious adverse reactions resulting in three deaths. [Wikipedia]

VOLUME OF DISTRIBUTION: Not Available

CATEGORIES:
Anti-Bacterial Agents

ABSORPTION: Studies in healthy volunteers indicate that the average bioavailability of temafloxacin exceeds 90%, with little intersubject variability.

INDICATION:
For the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections, genital and urinary infections like prostatitis, and skin infections.

PHARMACODYNAMICS:
Temafloxacin (marketed by Abbott Laboratories as Omniflox), is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic drug which was withdrawn from sale in the U.S. shortly after its approval in 1992 because of serious adverse reactions resulting in three deaths. Flouroquinolones such as lomefloxacin possess excellent activity against gram-negative aerobic bacteria such as E.coli and Neisseria gonorrhoea as well as gram-positive bacteria including S. pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus. They also posses effective activity against shigella, salmonella, campylobacter, gonococcal organisms, and multi drug resistant pseudomonas and enterobacter.

MECHANISM OF ACTION:
The bactericidal action of temafloxacin results from interference with the activity of the bacterial enzymes DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, which are needed for the transcription and replication of bacterial DNA. DNA gyrase appears to be the primary quinolone target for gram-negative bacteria. Topoisomerase IV appears to be the preferential target in gram-positive organisms. Interference with these two topoisomerases results in strand breakage of the bacterial chromosome, supercoiling, and resealing. As a result DNA replication and transcription is inhibited.

PROTEIN BINDING:
Not Available

METABOLISM:
Hepatic.

TOXICITY:
Severe adverse reactions, including allergic reactions and hemolytic anemia, developed in about fifty patients during the first four months of its use, leading to three patient deaths

AFECTED ORGANISMS:
Enteric bacteria and other eubacteria