UV radiation


OTHER NAMES:
Ultraviolet (UV) radiation
UV light
UV radiation


ABBREVIATIONS:
UV


DESCRIPTION: Ultraviolet (UV) "light" is a type of electromagnetic radiation. UV light has a shorter wavelength than visible light. Purple and violet light have shorter wavelengths than other colors of light, and ultraviolet has even shorter waves than violet does.
Ultraviolet radiation lies between visible light and X-rays on the electromagnetic spectrum. UV "light" has wavelengths between about 400 and 10 nanometers. The wavelength of violet light is around 400 nanometers (or 4,000 Å). Ultraviolet radiation oscillates at rates between about 800 terahertz (THz or 10v12 hertz) and 30,000 THz.
The ultraviolet spectrum is sometimes subdivided into the near UV (380 to 200 nanometer wavelengths) and extreme UV (200 to 10 nm wavelengths). Normal air is largely opaque to UV with wavelengths shorter than 200 nm (the extreme UV range); oxygen absorbs "light" in that part of the UV spectrum.

Ultraviolet A  (UVA) is an ultraviolet radiation with wavelengths between 315 and 400 nm (3.10–3.94 eV energy per photon), comprising over 99 per cent of that reaching the surface of the earth. It enhances the harmful effects of UVB, is responsible for some photosensitivity reactions, and is used therapeutically in the treatment of various skin disorders.
Most UV-A does reach the surface, but UV-A does little genetic damage to tissues.

Ultraviolet B  (UV-B) is an ultraviolet radiation with wavelengths between 315 nm–280 nm (3.94–4.43 eV energy per photon), comprising 1 per cent of that reaching the surface of the earth. It causes sunburn and a number of damaging photochemical changes within cells, including damage to DNA leading to premature aging of the skin, premalignant and malignant changes, and various photosensitivity reactions; it is also used therapeutically in the treatment of skin disorders.
UV-B is largely responsible for sunburn and skin cancer, though it is mostly absorbed by ozone before reaching the surface.

Ultraviolet C (UVC) is an ultraviolet radiation with wavelengths between 200 and 290 nm, all of which is filtered out by the ozone layer and does not reach the surface of the earth; it is germicidal and is also used in ultraviolet phototherapy.
UVGI utilises the short wavelength of UV that is harmful to microorganisms. It is effective in destroying the nucleic acids in these organisms so that their DNA is disrupted by the UV radiation. This removes their reproductive capabilities and kills them.
Earth's atmosphere prevents most UV radiation from space from reaching the ground. UV-C is entirely screened out by stratospheric ozone at around 35 km altitude.


DNA DAMAGES:
FapyG:A
FapyG
FapyA
(6-4)PP
thymine glycol (Tg)
cytosine glycol (Cg)
CPD


Filter

Click on a column header name to sort

NAME STRUCTURE PROTEINS DNA DAMAGE EFFECT(S) PATHWAY(S) RELATED
FapyG:A NTHL1 mutagenesis
point mutation
base excision repair (BER)
FapyG Fpg (MutM)
hOGG1
NEIL1
NEIL3
NTHL1
mutagenesis base excision repair (BER)
FapyA Nth (endo III)
Fpg (MutM)
Nth (endo III)
Nei (endo VIII)
NEIL1
mutagenesis base excision repair (BER)
(6-4)PP UvrB
UvrC
DDB2 (XPE)
mutagenesis
point mutation
stalled replication fork
nucleotide excision repair (NER)
prokaryotic (SOS) response
thymine glycol (Tg) Fpg (MutM)
Nei (endo VIII)
NEIL2
NTHL1
Nth (endo III)
C→T transition
mutagenesis
point mutation
stalled replication fork
substitution
T→C transition
transition
base excision repair (BER)
cytosine glycol (Cg) NTHL1 C→T transition
transition
base excision repair (BER)
CPD UvrB
UvrC
PhrB
ERCC4 (XPF)
ERCC5 (XPG)
Phr1p
DDB2 (XPE)
mutagenesis
point mutation
stalled replication fork
Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway
nucleotide excision repair (NER)
prokaryotic (SOS) response
direct reversal (DR)

Last modification date: Oct. 9, 2011